Past ASDC Conferences

Past conference locations and dates

ASDC has a long history of family conferences.  Here are a few of the recent conferences held.  Some family comments about past conferences include:  “This conference was absolutely the best.”  “We will be back for the next conference and will bring another family with us.”  “My family had a wonderful time!”  “We had an awesome experience!”  “I left the workshop wanting more”  “I learned more than I thought possible.”

2014 ASDC Annual Conference

Family Strong:  Together We Stand
June 27 – 29, 2014
The Learning Center for the Deaf, Framingham, MA

The conference brought families from all around the country together.  Keynote presenters Rachel Kolb of Albuquerque, NM and is currently a Rhodes scholar pursuing a M.St., in English literature at the University of Oxford  and Dr. Ronald J. Stern the current superintendent of the New Mexico School for the Deaf and President of he Conference of Educational Administrators of Schools and Programs for the Deaf (CEASD) gave families powerful messages about raising, educating, and expectations for students who are deaf.  Families and professionals left the conference re-energized and ready for the new school year.

Click here to view pictures from the 2014 ASDC Annual Conference.

22nd Biennial ASDC Biennial Conference

Parent Choices:   Keys To Your Child’s Future
June 22 – 26, 2011
Maryland School for the Deaf, Frederick, Maryland

The conference focused on exploring opportunities and building a strong foundation in five key areas, family, education, communication, community and extracurricular opportunities.   The conference provided families five days of information and fun.  Daytime workshops capitvated parents while children participated in educational and recreational activities.  Evening events brought families together by providing the opportunity to form new friendships and peer support.

 

21st Biennial ASDC Biennial Conference

June 24 – 28, 2009
Oklahoma School for the Deaf, Sulphur, Oklahoma

For everyone that attended it was an event to remember.  With more than 300 attendees, families from all over the world came together to celebrate their journeys, make new friends and learn about the many resources available for deaf children and their families.  Oklahoma is known for its hospitality, and this was more than apparent in all that the Oklahoma School for the Deaf did to make the families’ stay as fun-filled and enjoyable as possible.  Attendees were given opportunities to attend workshops during the day, while the children were kept busy with special children activities.  The evenings were filled with the rich and diverse culture of Oklahoma activities.

 

20th Biennial ASDC Biennial Conference

June 28 – July 2, 2007
The Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, St. Augustine, FL

With more than 500 people in attendance this was a spectacular conference offering something for everyone.  Children were kept busy every day with fun activities, including field trips to the zoo and the park.  Meanwhile parents were given the opportunity to hear keynote speakers such as Dr. I. King Jordan and his family, La-Verna Fountain and Kelby Brick.  A variety of workshops featuring topics such as resources, advocacy, key parent training, transition, reading, genetics, sexuality, internet safety and so much more were offered daily.  The evenings brought families back together to attend a carnival, take a train to St. Augustine, or watch a movie.

 

19th Biennial ASDC Biennial Conference

July 9-13, 2005
Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, Pittsburgh, PA

This years conference focused on reading, cochlear implants and preparing deaf children for life after high school.  Among the presenters was Rodney Danco, vice president of finance at Danco Precision, an industrial molding company founded by his uncle.  One of seven members of the school’s first graduating class in 1965, he recalled the advice he gave his classmates.  “I told them it’s okay to be deaf.”  Members of the “Mr. Rogers Neighborhood” cast and local sports figures opened the conference carnival, and a riverboat dinner trip on the three rivers of Pittsburgh was on the agenda.  Keynote addresses included Elaine Ocuto and son Luke, Rodney Danco, Jr., Mary Lou Novitsky, and Dr. Marc Marschark.

 

18th ASDC Biennial Conference

Family Reunion
July 26-30, 2003
Texas School for the Deaf, Austin, Texas

There was something for everyone at the 18th ASDC Biennial Conference.  While children took part in camp-like activities, parents attended educational workshops.  Evening events brought everyone back together for family focused activities.  Through the Family Reunion theme the goals was to root deaf children in a rich lineage of support by bringing together immediate and extended family members, professionals, and representatives from the Deaf community.  With the intent of creating a healthy family tree of relationships and services, they offered workshops on a variety of topics that offered information, outreach, and technical assistance to parents and siblings of deaf and hard of hearing children.  Parents and professionals were able to share their expertise, experiences and enthusiasm.

 

17th ASDC Biennial Conference

Yours, Mine and Ours
July 12-16, 2000
Gallaudet University, Washington, DC

Gallaudet’s first hosting of an ASDC Conference drew a record number of attendees to Kendall Green.  More than 700 people, making the conference a smashing success.  The theme “Yours, Mine and Ours,” reaffirmed the organization’s philosophy that parents working with deaf adults and professionals from the fields of education and human services enrich deaf children’s present and future.  The goals of the conference was for participants to emerge as a stronger family unit, better educated about the social, emotional, and educational needs of deaf children and their siblings, and better advocates for their children.  Programs were offered to conference-goers of all ages.  The numerous activities that were held during the week offered something for all interests and were geared to an individual’s degree of exposure to deafness.